Writing for Relief

I don’t know about you, but there are times when I feel that going a week (or two, or three) between therapy sessions is far too long.

I don’t think it is because I have an extraordinary amount of drama in my life, but there are some subjects and issues I only really discuss with my therapist. I’ve found that there are things I’ve brought up with friends or family that really weren’t constructive because nobody could relate, so short of therapy (or group therapy) I have a vat in my brain where all those thoughts just kind of slosh around in holding until I have the opportunity to wash the tank out each week.

A full and sloshing vat of pent up confusion or sadness or anger or whatever is hardly ideal. It can get so full that things start to spill over into my daily life, and that’s not cool. Sometimes it can get so full the structural integrity of the vat can’t hold it all and it blows up in my face. Squishy thought fragments get all over the floor, everything gets warped… it’s a nightmare to clean up.

Lately I would say I’ve been exploring some rather complex issues and thoughts and they aren’t things that I can easily talk about with the people around me. Sometimes I feel like things are just too abstract to be able to talk about in a way that will make sense to people, and therapy really helps me take pieces of an idea and mold them into something coherent.

Words.

But, as I’ve pointed out, that isn’t always an option. Sometimes I need my brain to form words sooner rather than later, because once these bits are formed into pieces that I can understand they become solid. I can take them from the vat and file them wherever they need to be filed in my head.

I learned pretty early in my life that writing is one way I can form those bits into full words and ideas on my own without waiting for the vat to overflow.

In my youth having a journal was (pardon my nerdiness here) kind of like having my own personal horcrux. It was someplace I could turn those thought fragments into words and store them to save space in my mind. At the same time negative thoughts and imagery could live in the journal safely without having to constantly nag at me. Looking back at these journals has showed me that they were really a stream-of-consciousness word barf sort of situation, and that’s fine (now where did I put that basilisk fang?). They weren’t meant to be on the top of the New York Times bestsellers list. Writing that way helped me cope with the sheer volume of everything inside my head and allowed me to have a little more space to concentrate.

As I got older writing and journaling began to allow me to ask questions of myself and the world and brainstorm what they might mean or what the answers might be. It became a tool for me to organize my thoughts more than just dump them.

Things progressed even further when I began writing this blog and used the writing process here to take questions or ideas I had about mental health, put them into words, and then try to arrange those words in ways that made sense to other people. I’d say this not only satisfied my desire to understand things better, it has also meant working toward being able to communicate better in general around the topic of mental health.

Writing is incredible that way, it is a form of expression I really think I took for granted but didn’t realize for a long time how many ways it has helped me. Writing in journals, writing poetry, writing blogs, there are a lot of options to try depending on what you might hope to get out of it. Some of the biggest takeaways I’ve encountered are:

  • Organizing thoughts
  • Purging negative thoughts or ideas for relief
  • Expressing hidden emotions I may not express otherwise
  • Better understanding (of myself, my illnesses, my issues, my situation, etc.)
  • Seeing things from another perspective (great with writing prompts)
  • Taking the terror out of something I’m afraid of (by exploring what is so scary about it)
  • A place to practice “positive self talk” (letting myself know that I am awesome, I’m doing a good job at life, and I’ve got this handled)
  • An outlet for conveying difficult ideas to other people (blogging, for example)
  • A way to become familiar with words that go with my emotions, being familiar with this vocabulary has made it easier for me to express them in situations outside of writing.
  • Perspective on a past version of myself, seeing how far I’ve come (only if I’m willing to go back and read it)
  • A sense of relief and release should I feel inclined to write about something I’m holding onto and destroying the writing later (shredding, burning, etc.)
  • You never know, something you wrote could be comedic gold in 20 years (check out Mortified for some super amazing adults reading their teenage journals aloud, I love it)

I’m sure that is just the tip of the iceberg there.

I wanted to share this topic this week because I’ve been dealing with some difficult topics in my life that are hazy. They remind me a lot of when I first started trying to write about mental illness and I found I didn’t have the words to describe what it felt like, or how it worked in me. Back then I didn’t even know what my emotions were, I was so used to pushing them down that I couldn’t readily identify one from another.

Likewise I’ve found myself opening all kinds of old boxes in my brain only to find that there are things that are still very relevant. They may not pertain to mental health, but they are things that, like my emotions, I’ve been cramming in boxes and throwing in deep storage for the past 30 years. As I’ve delved into all of this I’ve also started feeling some depression, I’ve felt confused and overwhelmed and quite a lot like I don’t believe I can handle it.

That’s the thing though, isn’t it? Mental illness isn’t going to wait for me to clean out the freezer and the garage before it rushes in to greet me, at least, not with the kind I have. Having treatment resistant Bipolar Disorder means having to multitask sometimes, even when what is in front of me doesn’t seem to have any baring on my illness specifically. Of course, I am more than willing to admit that the prospect of repressing any important memory or issue is probably depressing to anyone, but with my diagnosis I can pretty much anticipate that reaction in a very certain way.

One of the ways I’ve been coping with this has been to write. I’ve been writing non-stop for the past three weeks and then had to ease up the past few days because my hands were swollen from typing (which has meant not being able to play xbox either, rough!). Writing has become a place where I feel comfortable with my thoughts and feelings, and it is great because I don’t always feel that in social situations.

I would attribute writing (though I am self-soothing, getting outside, eating regularly, all that jazz) to the relatively level amount of depression I’ve been having. Yeah, it isn’t ideal… but being able to write enough to keep this vat from overflowing (ugh, and I just stained the new hardwoods too!) has helped keep me more rational and able to deal with the depression as it comes and has seemed to keep the depression from becoming totally consuming.

Whether I am writing something private or public it is comforting to know that I have complete control over what goes on the page, but the best feeling is to allow myself to step over the line of control, to allow myself to write anything and everything I feel. It can be an act of rebellion, it can be profound, it can be silly, it can be unidentifiable. In the end it doesn’t matter to me because it is the act that defines it, not the finished product.

Advertisements

5 responses to “Writing for Relief

  1. I’ve always used writing as a coping mechanism. Whether it’s writing a blog post or writing in my journal. Otherwise I obsess over those thoughts. Once I write them down, I move on as though it never happened. It’s a curious thing, and one of the reasons I could never stop writing.

  2. I thoroughly enjoyed this post. I agree with your closing statement, ‘it is the act that defines it, not the finished product.’
    I too have treatment resistant bipolar so I know what effort it takes to create, maintain, or retrieve some kind of sanity.
    But somehow writing is a sane place, a safe place, a creative outlet, and something I wake up looking forward to most days.
    It doesn’t matter so much if it is any good but it sure is fun trying.
    I got an idea this morning about writing about the different houses I’ve lived in and relating it to depression. So far it really stinks and is not coming along at all. But I am having fun trying.
    Don’t give up, there is hope for depression.

  3. Well written! I can identify with everything you’ve said here. I too write a blog which contains quite a few stream-of-consciousness entries that I later recognized as a sign of hypo/mania. I like looking back and seeing how much I’ve learned and how much better I am now.

  4. I couldn’t agree more, 2 or 3 weeks between therapy sessions seems way to long for me too. Your explanation of why is identical to mine. I have also learned so much about myself and my illness through blogging. The list of your takeaways is great, some I never realized might apply to me as well. Your posts are very well written, keep it up 🙂

  5. I have never done any kind of journaling, despite having numerous people tell me how effective it is, Currently, since I’m working on a manuscript, I feel guilty for writing anything other than my novel. Frustrating. I even feel the blog gets in my way. My blog has been tremendously cathartic, yet I still don’t think of it as therapeutic unless I make myself sit down and think through it logically.

    All of this seems to have to do more with my perceptions rather than reality. I need to work on that.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s