Total Eclipse of the Gut

For many years now I’ve been avoiding my gut instincts. Maybe avoiding is the wrong word, I’ve been wary of them and I haven’t been implementing them when they come up. I guess that is probably one definition of avoiding, but for whatever reason it feels important to me to add that part about feeling wary.

I’ve been thinking of my gut feelings as the product of an inner-office anonymous comments box and I’m the poor sap who has to sift through the comments that have been left there.

“This is a place to leave comments,” the box says, “ideas, and suggestions on how to make the office run more smoothly. They will be reviewed by management in the consciousness department.”

Of course, I haven’t been able to take the program very seriously when many of the comments have read things like:

Absolutely trust that guy who is inviting you inside his house and says there is free taco bell inside.

or

Can we please collect more roadkill? The IT department won’t even notice the smell.

or

Make Fridays “casual werewolf” day.

In the beginning I followed through with most of the suggestions in the box only to realize there are one or two A-holes in the office (damn you Psychosis! Mania! And don’t think I don’t see you sneaking around over there too Depression!) who keep leaving these bizarre notes they expect me to follow through on.

Without a filter to keep the odd comments from the important ones the results historically turned out poorly.

But that’s always the story, isn’t it? One or two bad apples ruining it for everyone. As the manager of the office inside my brain I’ve had to stop allowing comments from within myself simply to keep from doing some totally stupid and irrational things. The trouble is… all of the good, useful comments have also been discarded in the process.

In the meantime I’ve worked to try to improve the comments program. It has been temping every time someone has told me “just trust your gut” I feel like I ought to give it a second chance, despite constantly winding up in situations where I’ve taken away all of the pairs of scissors and staplers in the office during a busy week or deprived my employees of contact with the outside world for days until they go on strike and say, “you know, we really aren’t getting any work done at this rate.”

As someone who wants to manage this office well I’ve taken it upon myself to try to find answers. To research and test through trial and error what I could do to keep the team running. I’ve scoured the anonymous comments with handwriting analysis in hopes of being able to pull Psychosis’ notes from the rest (and the rest of those who love to throw a wrench into things) with no luck. I even hired on a new employee (Rationalization) to help manage the comments department but ultimately it didn’t seem to make much difference. Before long Rationalization seemed willing to justify why casual-werewolf-Fridays would be great and I had to halt the project over again.

While I was searching for a solution I wasn’t expecting things to get worse. One of my employees, Sexuality, began leaving notes in the comment box in an effort to make the break-room more LGBT friendly. I discarded all of those comments with the suspicion that they may have come from Psychosis playing a prank. Denying all of the comments meant denying the legitimate ones too, and before long Sexuality was upset and launching a full scale mutiny, bringing all of her closest co-workers on board. Depression wailed, Energy dropped dramatically and wouldn’t come out from under their desk, and Self-Worth made a very rude gesture at me during my 3 pm coffee break.

When Intimacy made a request to work harder on relationships in an effort to feel more connected I ignored it. I was certain it was Psychosis again, and even though I hadn’t seen them in weeks I thought for sure it was some game of misdirection. Pretty soon Anger snapped after a paper jam and ripped the feeder tray off the unit and Productivity simply stood up and said, “I can’t work in an environment like this, I’m going home.”

I watched chaos erupt from my cubicle and that’s when my phone rang.

“Yes, Department of Consciousness here,” I answered.

“This is HR,” a voice said. “It has come to our attention that you’ve denied a request to make the breakroom more LGBT friendly and I’m afraid Sexuality has come to us to file a complaint.”

Sexuality filed that comment?!?” I asked astounded, “Are you sure it wasn’t Psychosis?

“Sarah, Psychosis hasn’t been in in weeks, hasn’t even booted up to work remotely, there hasn’t been a need. I’m afraid the issue at hand is bordering on discrimination at this point so it needs to be addressed immediately. If you can’t take care of it, we’ll find someone who can.” The voice said.

“Of course!” my mind reeled, horror struck that I had ignored something so important. “Right away!”

“Good day.” The voice added.

“Wait!” I quickly cried upon realizing I’d never encountered anyone from HR, “Who is this?” But all I heard with a click followed by a dial tone.

 *

I’ve gone through years of therapy trying to figure out how to discern which piece of my internal dialogue to listen to, how to pinpoint the difference between when my gut says something to me and when it is mental illness pushing me in a specific direction.

Ultimately I reached the point where I felt the need to scrutinize everything that ran through my head before making any decisions. It didn’t keep me from having manic episodes, or depressive episodes, or psychotic episodes or doing wildly irrational things. All it did was create a backlog of personal issues that built up and began contributing to my anger and depression and paving strange avenues that I’d find myself trying to take to solve those issues when I was psychotic or manic. In some ways it seems as though Psychosis was trying to help me, attempting to take back doors to solve issues I wasn’t solving directly.

That is part of what has made everything so blurry. I was so worked up and emotional about some issues when I was psychotic (or depressed or manic) I couldn’t see how important the same issues were to me when I wasn’t. I simply didn’t feel the same level of intensity about them when I was feeling stable, even though they still mattered.

All this time I’ve considered psychosis to be like a bubble, like I could discard anything that happened within the bubble in which the episode took place and discount any aspect as being useful or informative (though usually a good story later). The psychosis bubbles that arose eclipsed my gut instincts entirely, or at least discounting anything within those bubbles often also meant discounting real and important instincts. Really, the more time I take to understand the issues I’ve been avoiding, the more it seems that my episodes have acted more like a magnet drawn intensely to those same issues rather than provoke or direct me toward new useless ones.

I’m sure all that is confusing, and it is to me too. Even so, this has been a huge revelation for me because it means the eclipse is ending. I’m realizing that there is value in every comment in that comment box, even the ones I considered to be a joke.

“You mean, you’re listening to yourself again?” My therapist asked last week.

*

I imagined myself in that office, smeared with printer toner and covered in paper cuts climbing on top of my desk and waving my arms.

“Alright! Alright!” I shouted at them. “I’ve been a terrible manager, I can see that now. Ignoring you isn’t helping us get things done and the box,” I kicked the comments box off my desk onto the carpet littered with remnants from the three hole punch and paper clips, “screw the box. The box isn’t working! From now on we’ll have an open door policy and if you need something you can come directly to me. Even you Psychosis,” I added as a fit of giggles came from over one of the speaker phones.

“I’m sorry I went behind your back,” Sexuality said to me as the last of the internal raging died down and we began cleaning up.

“I don’t blame you,” I replied, dumping the old comments box into the trash. “I guess I was so wrapped up in working on communicating to the outside world that I forgot the importance of communication here.”

*

“Um, yes,” I replied to my therapist, blinking for a moment. “I am listening, and I expect I have a hell of a lot to say.”

 

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One response to “Total Eclipse of the Gut

  1. Wow! I’ve always thought you were a talented and insightful writer, but this is genius. I have so much to think about.

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