Daily Archives: May 19, 2014

When Therapy Doesn’t Work

I’m a firm believer that therapy has helped me a lot. It has helped me understand things about myself I didn’t know before. It has helped me move on and get closure from trauma. It has also been a space for me to be able to express all of my frustrations (without bringing down everyone else in my life). I have learned the so-called “tools” in therapy to help me cope with anxiety and bipolar episodes as well. In fact, I often suggest to people dealing with any issue they find to be overwhelming (not just mental illness) that they see a counselor or therapist to talk about it. Something about talking about our problems out loud helps us understand them better, so overall I think it is a win-win situation.

While all that sounds great (and it is all true), finding a therapist who is a good fit can be challenging. On more than one occasion I’ve found myself in a position where the benefits I was receiving from therapy was being outweighed by negative parts of the experience.

In the past I’ve had issues with the attitudes of therapists, whether that was from being aggressive (which was a turn-off for me), or being too passive (not seeming to care about my issues). I’ve had issues with therapists who had conflicting viewpoints from me (though rarely). I’ve had issues with therapists who didn’t know enough about the issues I was dealing with to provide a well-educated viewpoint.

The one issue I have had with therapists that I consider a hands-down deal-breaker is disorganization.

As someone who lives with Bipolar Disorder, OCD, and Anxiety, there is a certain level of reliability that I require from my health care providers. That includes my primary doctor, my prescribing psychiatrist, and my counselor or therapist. There are times where my condition requires emergency treatment, and I need to be able to rely on my team to get the help I need.

I always feel that I am in a constant state of reminding people that they should expect quality treatment from their doctors, therapists being no exception to the rule. You wouldn’t believe how many people I know who continue to see and pay therapists who do not act respectful to them, who don’t call them back in a timely manner, or who make them feel worse after a session than when they came in. Essentially, this is a situation where you are paying someone to provide support to you… if they aren’t doing that, what is the point?

The difficulty comes in finding the right match, and that many therapists have continued to have paying patients despite providing poor care. If people seeking out therapists aren’t demanding great service, how can we expect to find that great service without creating that demand?

At the same time, I understand that therapists are human. They’re human! Some of them have even gotten into their current field because of their experiences with depression or mental illness in their own lives, which I think is awesome. This is one of the reasons why I think there is a certain level of negotiation you can turn to when it comes to interacting with a therapist.

I’ve been having trouble with my most recent therapist since I began seeing her. I knew part of it was because I liked the one before her so much and we’d worked so well together, so when I reached the point where I was having trouble connecting with her (the new one), we talked about it. Since then I found she was much more attentive and empathetic to what I was saying, which really helped me feel more at ease.

Over the last year and a half, we’ve had ups and downs. For a while she was rarely on time, but began showing an active interest in fixing that, so I let it go.

What I can’t let go, however, was last week’s Lithium emergency. She told me on Tuesday she would contact my (potential) future psychiatrist about a prescription, and then never called me back. She also seemed wildly cavalier about the notion that I would suddenly be unmedicated… which is a big red flag for me. If one of the people on my healthcare team doesn’t care when I am experiencing an emergency, I know I need to shift that position to someone who will. Even giving her the benefit of the doubt (she could have been busy?) I would rather work with someone who has the time to help me.

Six months ago I was worried sick about the prospect of changing therapists, but now I think it is necessary. I am only hoping the clinic will allow me to switch to another person there, instead of having to reach out to other clinics in the area.

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